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  • By Bobby Moore
  • Posted Saturday, December 15, 2018

Helping School Leaders Develop Collective Teacher Efficacy

After conducting a meta analyses on more than 800 studies on education practices, John Hattie reports that Collective Teacher Efficacy (CTE) has the greatest impact on student learning (1.57 effect size). This effect is double the effect of student feedback (.75 effect size). What many educators do not know is that Collective Efficacy research is more than two decades old, and it is only now through Hattie’s meta-analyses of school research, that many practitioners are hearing about it for the first time. Many educators are asking, “What is Teacher Collective Efficacy, and how do we develop it?” EPIC Impact is not only helping school leaders understand the power of collective efficacy, but help school leaders build it with their schools.

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  • By KaiLonnie Dunsmore
  • Posted Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Literacy Leadership

Dr. Bobby Moore, a national expert on school leadership and turnaround, describes the characteristic practices and goals of a principal who serves as a school "literacy leader".  and levers for creating a system wide culture of literacy.

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  • By KaiLonnie Dunsmore
  • Posted Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Supporting Family Literacy & Engagement

This gues blog is by Candace Kenyatta co-founder of LOCI partner, Capstone Academia.  It provides a reflection on the family engagement work of Northampton school literacy coach Pamela Miles, part of LOCI's LIREC project, and reflects on the conditions needed to support successful family literacy partnership. 

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  • By KaiLonnie Dunsmore
  • Posted Sunday, April 8, 2018

Designing & Managing High Quality Literacy Centers

High quality literacy centers are a critical component in an effective English Language Arts curriculum both because they provide individual/small group time to work on specific skills or practices and, because when done well, they allow the teacher to provide robust differentiated reading instruction to small groups of students.  Whatever your model for differentiating reading instruction, literacy centers are generally “the” critical foundation for providing all students with meaningful tasks in ways that support teacher time for targeted small group reading instruction.

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  • By KaiLonnie Dunsmore
  • Posted Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Social Emotional Learning: the Foundations Every Teacher Needs to Know

The Literacy Organizational Capacity Initiative (LOCI) sponsored a webinar on Social Emotional Learning: the Foundations Every Teacher Needs to Know.

Today's literacy classrooms are expected to be more interactive, collaborative, and rigorous than ever before. Research has shown that when educators attend to the social emotional needs of students and offer instruction in the skills necessary to successfully engage with intrapersonal and interpersonal interactions, academic achievement is enhanced. What are these social-emotional competencies, how are they developed, and how can they be integrated in instruction throughout the school day? This free webinar will share information that we at LOCI believes undergirds any effective literacy curriculum and is especially critical in constructing a school culture that supports successful, engaged, and fully present learning for students and teachers alike.

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  • By KaiLonnie Dunsmore
  • Posted Saturday, December 2, 2017

We Don’t Just Want to Do Good Work. We Want to Do Impactful Work.

When I evaluate the quality of professional development that our team is doing in school, I look at how effectively we are building capacity with the system through examining:  Changes in instructional practice;Improvements in student learning outcomes; Creation of a culture which balances teacher risk-taking with scaffolds, support, and encouragement.  There are schools where we have a positive relationship and significant investment in supporting change in teacher practice but I raise with leadership my concerns about our impact because we’re not building capacity in the system to support ongoing learning.  Our goal is to work ourselves out of a job!   I can think of several sites where we have invested significantly in providing professional development through a model that includes onsite workshops; webinars with national experts; classroom observation and coaching; inquiry cycles with multi-media resources to support teacher professional learning community work; and virtual design support and coaching with the school literacy coach.  We know we are doing good work but I am led to raise questions with leadership about whether collectively we are aligning our priorities to ensure impact on the system as a whole.  We don’t want business as usual except for the days in which we are there.  Our goal is to enact our work in such a way that we create increasing coherence and capacity in the system as a whole.  

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  • By Jennifer Adams
  • Posted Thursday, September 21, 2017

Connecting with high-quality texts: Selecting books to foster rigor in reading comprehension

The more connections we can make across our literacy practices, the more coherent our instruction will be. As part of effective instruction, teachers select a text to read that is linked to our end goals. If we are asking students to write with descriptive language, we read a text that models descriptive language, we talk about this model during multiple read alouds, and identify the language that we want to target from the text. We guide students’ interaction with descriptive language in small, teacher-led groups. We build word wall, or language walls that capture the descriptive language we are practicing. We provide opportunities for students to hear the books read fluently several times in a listening center, so they can follow along while they are listening. We support students’ attempts at reading and writing texts independently. This approach implies that we have identified our instructional goal during planning time. And that we have matched the text with our purpose.

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  • By Jennifer Adams
  • Posted Thursday, September 21, 2017

“What did you do this summer?”: Motivation to Read

Finding out about children in our learning community is the first step to purposeful instruction. It took years of experience for me to learn how to make meaning from formative assessment and use the information to guide instruction. Eventually I learned this process needed to start before the school year officially began and that getting to know my students meant more than looking at scores from the year before.

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